Tag Archives: Historical fiction

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles ~ Book Review & Discussion Guide

Pages:  462

Published:  September 6, 2016

Awards:  Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Historical Fiction (2016)

Format:  Audiobook

 

 

This was a gorgeously written book reminiscent All the Light We Cannot See in the beauty of its writing and the descriptiveness of its prose.  Count Alexander Rostov has come before a tribunal in the year 1922 because of a controversial piece of poetry written back in 1905.  If found guilty of inciting action against the current Bolshevik regime through the writing and distribution of this poem, which he is,  he could be killed or sent to Siberia.  However, instead, he is  placed under house arrest.  As he had been living in the Hotel Metropol, this is where he will remain.  Upon receiving his sentence he is moved up to a small room in the attic and out of his luxurious suite.  He must  choose among his belongings which to take with him.

After the tribunal, the Count seems to shrink himself away and even contemplates suicide briefly,  However, very soon he returns to life again and the reader begins to know the real Count.  The Count is first and foremost a gentleman.  He is a man of intellect, with exquisite manners and refined tastes, a loyal friend, and a man who believes in doing things the right way.  He is charming and charismatic.  He is a man to love throughout this novel.  When he takes on a task, he does it to his utmost ability.  Once he has come to terms with life within the confines of the hotel, it becomes a mini city for him.  Young Nina, the Eloise of the hotel, becomes his tour guide creating a playground of the landscape.  Willowy Anna Urbanova becomes his lover.  He begins to work in the Boyarski, one of the hotel’s restaurants.  He develops close relationships with Emil the chef, Andrey the matre’ d, and Vasily the concierge and they begin to have nightly meetings together.

It is within the confines of the hotel, that the Count must view Russia, the war and it’s changing political landscape.  His friend Mishka from school visits off and on, and seems to suffer from the changing times.  Nina, an idealist and thinker, grows up and marries.  She returns asking the Count to care for her daughter, Sofia,  while she seeks out her husband who has been taken away.  These are just a couple of the Count’s visitors through whose eyes the Count must view the outside world.  The Count while under house arrest for these 30 years, actually seems to be the  one who has been privileged.  He has escaped World War II.  He has escaped the replacement of a Tsarist aristocracy with Bolchevism.  Within the Hotel, the Count gains privilege as the head waiter of the Boyarsky.  He sets table arrangements for members of the Communist party and gains access to their conversations.  At the same time he is secretly councils one of the high ranking Soviet apparatchik in American and European language and culture.

There are many developments and twists as the story evolves, so I will say no more. It is an excellent book with well developed characters and interesting historical backdrop.  I listened to this, however, I would have much preferred to have read it.  Given the lengthy descriptions, I found myself tuning out at times and thinking of other things.  This is a novel that demands a lot of attention.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion Questions:

  1.  Why do you think the Count was ordered to house arrest rather than a more severe punishment?
  2. What does Nina teach the Count?
  3. How do you think the Count was able to get away with meeting all the various people that he did?
  4. Who wrote the poem for which the Count is arrested?  Why do you think the Count protects his friend?  Why does he feel that by protecting his friend, he was actually the more protected?
  5. Describe life for Mishka during the Count’s 30 years in the hotel.  Compare and contrast this with the Count’s life.
  6. Why are the wine labels removed?
  7. Why do you think the Count is allowed as much autonomy as he does under house arrest?  Do you think this is realistic?
  8. What qualities make the Count a gentleman?  How do society’s negative connotations of aristocracy compare to the positive qualities of a gentleman?
  9. Why do you think Casablanca the Count’s favorite movie?  What does it suggest about the Count’s perception of his situation?
  10. Discuss the Count’s role as a father.
  11. At one point, the Count is accused of keeping all of his eggs in separate baskets.  Explain this.
  12. Discuss the scene on the rooftop with the beekeeper.
  13. Why is the reader asked to remember Prince Petrov?  How is his role important towards the end of the book?
  14. Discuss the ending of the book.  Where do you think Sofia and the Count will end up living?

 

Craig Taylor’s New York Times Review

Amor Towles Website

LitLovers Discussion Questions

Penguin Random House Discussion Guide

 

We Shall Not All Sleep by Estep Nagy ~ Book Review & Discussion Guide

Pages:  288

Expected Publication Date:  July 4, 2017

Format:  E-book from netgalley

 

 

 

 

I thought this book was quite brilliant, very literary, and highly intriguing.  It takes place over a few days, however, there are flashbacks to earlier times such that the reader gets a much longer and larger view into the lives of the characters.

The setting is July 1964 during the era of McCarthyism on Seven Island in northern Maine.  Seven is a fictional island home to two very wealthy families whose history is interconnected dating back to  the 1700s.  In present day, each family owns a beautiful house on the island, one yellow and one white.  There is a barn for the animals and outbuildings for the staff, all in bright red.  The Hillsingers are in one house and the Quicks are in the other.  Interestingly, although their histories are connected and the men of these houses married two sisters, their lives have been very separate until these 3 days spent on the island where past and present collide.  There is a huge cast of characters which includes  Billy Quick, Jim Hillsinger, their immediate families, their guests, and the staff.  Within each chapter past and present are described  and the narration jumps from one situation to another.  At first I found this confusing and difficult to track, but fairly quickly on, I had figured out who was who and reading this book was like watching a movie unfold.  It really had a cinematic quality of switching from one scene to another as in a movie.  I can’t compare this quality of the book to another like it, it seemed quite unique.  The effect was tantalizing and compelling, making this a very quick read.  The storyline builds and compounds as the novel progresses reaching the crescendo point by the end.

I won’t say much more as I don’t want to give too much away.  I would definitely recommend this book.  It would make a great beach read as well as a great book club choice.  It contains many historical elements without feeling like it is beating you over the head with them.  They simply exist in the book only because they are important to explaining the characters and their situation.    There are no wasted words in this novel.  It is written succinctly, beautifully and intentionally.   However, the reader, needs to pay close attention, or will miss something.  In short, well written, well researched and well worth the read!

Discussion Questions:

  1.  John Wilkie says “Seven Island is impossible.”  What does he mean by this?  Why does lila enjoy this comment?
  2. In the ARC version, lila’s name is not capitalized while the other characters names are.  Why do you think this is?  What effect does it have on the reader?
  3. “We shall not all sleep” is part of 1 Corinthians “Behold, I tell you a mystery: we shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed.”  which is also part of the dedication of this novel.  Explain the title and it’s meaning in the context of this novel.
  4. Jim Hillsinger’s father is referred to only as “Old Man.”  Why do you think this is?  Does this have the effect of building him up or diminishing him?
  5. Catta dreams of an eagle dropping out of the sky hunting a rabbit.  Why do you think this it?
  6. Why was it important to Catta to know whether or not the eagles’ nest was a lie or not?
  7. Why was it important for the Old Man to have Catta spend the night on Baffin?
  8. Why does lila find herself now in love with Billy Quick when previously she had merely tolerated him?   What has changed?
  9. In the final conversation between Jim and Billy, Billy is left with the impression that Jim had traded his wife for a list of names.  What do you think the future holds for Billy, Jim and Lila?  Where will there relationships go from here?
  10. Describe the character of James.  Why does he get away with his violent schemes?

The Girls by Emma Cline ~ Book Review & Discussion Guide

 

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Pages: 355

Published: June 14, 2016

Format: Audiobook

 

 

 

What an awesome premise for a novel!  Who isn’t intrigued by cult culture and the brutal Manson murders.  This story is told from the point of view of one of “the girls,”  one who does not participate in the murders, but nonetheless becomes drawn in by them and a part of their group.  It is told from the perspective of adulthood in a way, that makes the allure and enchantment of being part of this group understandable for girls lacking close bonds in their life.  But, the perspective of the town and those not drawn in is also interspersed within the novel to remind the reader of the real conditions there, the filth, squalor, and wickedness.

Evie, the narrator was easy prey to fall into the cult.  Her parents had divorced.  She wasn’t feeling particularly close to either one of them and she and her best friend were on the outs.  She had been carelessly dismissed by the boy she had a crush on.  She was lonely and looking for close companionship.  When she saw Suzanne, she was immediately intrigued by her easy free manner.  She began feeling the allure of belong to a group that took care of each other, that laughed together and teased each other.  A group that had tremendous freedom from the outside world and its rules.

Evie, the fictional narrator of this story is coming of age at a time when her home environment is dysfunctional and lonely.  She begins to spend more and more time at the ranch with “the girls” who really were that, girls in their late teen years, mostly runaways with no where else to go.  She participates in the drug culture, the sex, the thievery and deception.  She feels like she is willing to do whatever is asked for the group and puts them above all else.  They do not include her in the murders, kicking her out of the car at the last minute, which begs the question, could she have been capable of committing the heinous murders as well?  Were these girls inherently evil or was it the cult setting and the drug culture?  These questions and mysteries stay with Evie into adulthood, as she wonders what might have been.

Evie’s story is juxtaposed with her modern day life far into adulthood, in which she is housesitting for her friend Dan.  Dan’s son, who has sociopathic tendencies, shows up at the house with his very young, perhaps 14 year old girlfriend.  This young girl is vulnerable and accepting of circumstances and treatment that she does not deserve from Julian (Dan’s son) and his friend Zev.  Evie tries to impart some wisdom, however it falls upon deaf ears.  How easy is it for young girls to be swept up along the wrong path, to accept the cruelty of boys and men as they are learning who they are at a point when they are being women and may not have close relationships with family, friends, or mentors to help them through.

The story is thrilling and exciting.  It keeps you on the edge of your seat.  It makes you rethink what it was like to have been one of “the girls.”  It is a very loose interpretation that largely ignores the racist implications of Charles Manson’s mission as well as some very horrific ways in which he treated the girls in his quasi-commune.  However, it is excellently written, fun to read, and brings up some great moral questions.  images-2

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Charles Manson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the courthouse.  Susan Atkins is on left behind the guard.

 

 

charles-manson-312Some Manson family members at the Spahn Ranch.

 

 

 

 

Discussion Questions:

  1.  How are young Evie and Sasha alike and dissimilar?  Do you think Evie sees younger self in Sasha?
  2. How has the grown Evie changed from her young self?
  3. Why do you think that Evie is not angry at her father for cheating and leaving her mother?
  4. Why do you think Evie pities her mother?
  5. How would you describe Evie’s friendship with Connie?  With Suzanne?  How do these differ?
  6. How do you feel about Evie’s introduction to sex?
  7. Why do you think that Evie cannot see the Ranch for the broken down trash heap that it is?
  8. What is the allure of this group to Evie and others?  What keeps them there when things start to fall apart?
  9. When the police finally come, why do you think Russell runs and the girls don’t?
  10. Why do you think that Evie never says anything to anyone about her knowledge of the murders over those months when they were searching for the killer/s?
  11. Who is Evie’s bond to?  Why is this important?
  12. Suzanne imparts looks to Evie many times through the course of the novel, which are difficult to interpret.   How do you think Suzanne feels about Evie?  Why do you think Suzanne was hesitant to bring Evie to the ranch initially?  Why do you think Suzanne distances herself from Evie after Evie’s rendezvous with Russell? Why do you think Suzanne pushed Evie from the car prior to the murders?
  13. Evie saw a growing side to Suzanne with time that was full of hatred.  What do you think fueled this hatred?  Do you think that Suzanne was inherently evil or was made evil by her affiliation with Russell and the culture on the ranch?

Outline of the Manson murders with prison times served for all involved

Discussion Guide by LitLovers

New York Times Review of “The Girls”

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead ~ Book Review & Discussion Guide

 

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Pages: 320

Publication Date:  August 2, 2016

Literary Awards:  Kirkus Prize Nominee for Fiction (2016),  Oprah’s Book Club Selection (2016)

Format:  E-book

 

A work of amazing scope and breadth, shocking in the brutality of events, and so pertinent to politics and race discussions being held today.  This is an important piece of literature reminding Americans of our history, the beginnings of race relations in our country, and you can follow this thread out to today and realize that we still have a long way to go.  I love that Michelle Obama reminded us that the white house was built by slaves, at the DNR earlier this month, a fact that is also mentioned in this book.  Our government is literally built on slavery.

“White folk eat you up but sometimes colored folk eat you up, too.”

Cora is the protagonist of the novel, born on a Georgia cotton plantation, whose mother runs away from the plantation while Cora is still young.  Cora is mistreated by the slave owners and fellow slaves alike, being shunned, raped, whipped, and degraded in every way seemingly possible.   She is labelled a stray.  The horrors she and others face on the plantation at the outset of this novel are shocking in their rendering and brutality.

“With strategic sterilization – first the women but both sexes in time – we could free them from bondage without the fear that they’d butcher us in our sleep.”

Caesar, a fellow slave, approaches her with an escape plan and she accepts.  The book follows Cora’s tortuous escape route on a literal underground railroad, bringing a magical element into the novel.  This isn’t the only time that Colson Whitehead takes liberty with historical elements.  Each stop along the railroad highlight different aspects of African American history, that in reality may have occurred in vastly different times and places.  While Cora and Caesar are in South Carolina, the Tuskegee experiment is being conducted on the black population, an event that in history does not occur until much later, 1932-1972, with penicillin becoming available for the treatment of syphilis in 1947.  It was also here in South Carolina, where Cora is offered sterilization and is asked to help persuade the other blacks living there to accept this measure.

“In North Carolina, the negro race did not exist except at the end of ropes.”  Again, the fear many whites have of blacks is manifested in hatred and horrific acts.  The North Carolinians in the novel abolished slavery by abolishing blacks from the state; those who did not leave willingly were hung along the “Freedom Trail,” as decided by the “Justice Convention.”  Such ironical terms are attached to such atrocities to emphasize the justification involved.   “But they were prisoners like she was, shackled to fear.”  Those who aid Cora are subjected to the same fate as blacks.

Whitehead tackles many heavy issues in this novel, even religion.  Cora sees paradox and hypocrisy in the bible.  Ridgeway and other use the bible to find justification for their cause and actions.  It is interesting to me the continuing theme of religion, something that many people find such comfort and peace in, also becomes a tool or justification for divisiveness and war.

In Tennesee, Whitehead tackles the treatment of Native Americans. “Manifest Destiny” is cited as the ultimate narcissistic doctrine of self justification for the mistreatment and displacement of another race.

Some chapters are named for the location in which they occur, but others are named after a character in the book, to get better insight into their mindset and thinking.  Interestingly and unsurprisingly, the thugs of society, found purpose in becoming slave catchers.  Homer never received his own chapter, and this leaves the reader wondering why a free black would choose to spend his life working and living alongside Ridgeway, a monstrous slave-catcher.

Valentine’s Farm, in Indiana, becomes a relative utopia, where blacks can live freely and share ideas, at least for a time.  Lander states, “And America, too, is a delusion, the grandest one of all.  The white race believes – that it is their right to take the land.  To kill the Indians.  Make war.  Enslave their brothers.  This nation shouldn’t exist, if there is any justice in the world, for its foundations are murder, theft, and cruelty.  Yet here we are.”  These words are so important.

Whitehead’s words and message throughout this novel are direct, strong, and sweeping. We cannot be blind to our past. We cannot repeat the past by creating a culture of fear. We must live with our past, acknowledge our past and continue to make peace with it. There is so much to take in with this novel – the brutality of slavery and treatment of blacks outside of slavery, the kindness shown by those who were willing to risk their lives to help, the feeling that there is nowhere to escape to, only places to flee, the deeply seated racial prejudice and violence that continues, and so much more. I highly recommend this book to everyone! It is hugely pertinent to current times, beautifully rendered, and brilliant. There is so much to this novel, that I had to sit and think about it for days before attempting to put thoughts into a review. It is excellent material for discussion.   images

Discussion Questions:

  1.  Why do you think the author chose a female for the main character?
  2. How did you feel about the historical facts being changed for the sake of the story here?
  3. How does fear affect people?
  4. What role does religion play in this novel?
  5. How is the Hob represented outside of the plantation?
  6. Do you think there was anywhere truly safe to escape to in these times?
  7. Discuss branding, literally and figuratively.  How are the former slaves branded?
  8. In what way do blacks become equals to whites in this novel?
  9. What did you suspect happened to Mabel, Cora’s mother?
  10. Why is the character Homer important?  Why do you think he stays with Ridgeway?
  11. Discuss some of the discussions that took place on the Valentine farm.
  12. Discuss the role of those who helped slaves escape via the underground railroad and the risks taken.

Interview with Colson Whitehead published in Vulture

Review published by NPR

Review published in NY Times

Oprah’s Reading Group Guide

The Rent Collector by Camron Wright ~ Book Review & Discussion Guide

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Pages: 304

Published:  September 2012

Format:  E-book

 

 

 

I really enjoyed the quotes from literature incorporated into the story.  I enjoyed the historical piece,  learning about the Khmer Rouge revolution and the genocide that occurred.  I also appreciated the friendship between Sang Ly and Sopeap.  It was interesting to see Sang Ly see the world differently through literature.

However, I did not feel like the representation of the people living at the dump was accurate or believably portrayed.  I felt that the tone and manner of the characters was off.  There was something almost blissful about the way these people viewed their homes and their way of life that did not ring true to me.  Here were a group of people living in utter abject poverty on the edge of a garbage heap, making their living picking through trash, barely surviving.  They were dealing with gangs, starvation, children being sold into prostitution, and health issues.   I did not feel that the author was truly connected to and connecting the reader to the extreme poverty and desperateness of the situation.  I felt the storyline was an easy enjoyable read that all came together nicely in the end, however it was all hard to swallow. 

I have previously read Katherine Boo’s “Behind the Beautiful Forevers” and felt that she did an amazing job in researching and writing that book.  She lived in Mumbai among the poorest of the poor who also worked as trash collectors and documented their stories in her nonfictional account.  I would highly recommend skipping this book and reading that book instead to get a more accurate rendition of living and social conditions in a slum.

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Map of Cambodia:

Phnom Penh – the city where Sopped grew up as well as where the dump is

Prey Veng Province – Sang Ly’s homeland

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Pictures and details about Stung Meanchey, the largest municipal wastedump in Cambodia.

There were several quotes I liked from the book, including the following.

“People only go to the places they have visited in their minds.”

“If we dive into the pool before it’s full, we’ll hit our heads.”

“Literature is a cake with many toys baked inside – and even if you find them all, if you don’t enjoy the path that leads you to them, it will be a hollow accomplishment.”

Discussion Questions:

  1.  How would you describe Sang Ly and Ki’s relationship?
  2. Do you view Ki as a hero?  Why or why not?
  3. How would you describe Sopeap and Sang Ly’s relationship?
  4. Why do you think that alternative medicine finally works Nisay?
  5. What role does luck play in the novel?
  6. Why do you think Ki is leery of Sang Ly learning to read at first?
  7. How do you think that Sang Ly’s ability to read will affect their lives?

 

Review by the Book Dragon

Reading Group Discussion Guide from Camron Wright’s website

 

 

The Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson ~ Book Review & Discussion Guide

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Pages:  496

Expected Publication:  March 22, 2016

Format:  E-book from netgalley

 

 

 

 

This historical fiction novel is set in the idyllic countryside of Rye the summer before England enters WW1.  It begins as a comedy of manners as Beatrice Nash arrives at the home of Agatha and John Kent to be the new Latin teacher in Rye.  Agatha’s nephews are there for the summer as well and there develops a romantic interest between Beatrice who has decided not to marry and one of the nephews who had planned on proposing to another woman.  The social milieu of the time is explored throughout this book.   The book explores society’s reaction to divorce, upward mobility, women’s rights, homosexuality, pregnancy outside of marriage (even if the result of rape).    The scope of this book is large.   The reader gets to know the Kents, their nephews, and Beatrice intimately through this novel, as well as their closest friends and associates.  You learn how the politics and society are deeply entangled in the way the town functions and decisions are made.

All plans for the future are turned on their head with the start of the war, however.  First, refugees from Belgium arrive and are taken in by various residents of Rye.  After getting to know and love so many young people in this idyllic setting, the young men begin going off to war.  Some are injured, some are killed; all are affected by the war in different ways.  People come together in ways they wouldn’t have pre-war.  You watch the social fabric and rules start to change in subtle ways.  There is a dramatic shift from prewar to wartime notable in the pace of events.  The speech even changes from verbose to succinct.  As Daniel says to Hugh, “War makes our needs so much smaller.  In ordinary life, I never understood how much pleasure it gives me to see you.”  The characters realize more than ever, through war, what and who is most important to them.

I loved the characters, the hilarity of the social scenes, the budding romance between Hugh and Beatrice.  I loved the social banter, the eloquent wordy ways in which they would argue and criticise each other, especially pre-war.  The characters were very well developed such that I truly cared about them, who they ended up with, and how they fared.  I thought that the contrast between the pre-war scenes and after war was declared very well done.  The final reveal in the epilogue was something I had been wondering the entire book, and I was glad that that piece finally came to light.  I gave this novel  images-2  for a brilliantly written, enjoyable novel complete with family drama, societal etiquette,  romance, and major societal commentaries on the values held by the people in England at the time.

My favorite laugh-out-loud scene in the book is when Agatha Kent and Beatrice Nash are naked sunbathing in Agatha’s garden the morning following Beatrice’s arrival in Rye.

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Map of East Sussex, where Rye is

 

 

 

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Map demonstrating the military alliances of the time

 

 

Discussion Questions:

  1.  Who was your favorite character and why?
  2. Why did you think Agatha Kent favored Daniel over Hugh?  Did this change after reading the epilogue?
  3. How would you describe Daniel’s relationship with Craigmore?
  4. Why does Lord North dislike Daniel?
  5. How would you describe Hugh’s relationship with Lucy Ramsey?
  6. Is the role of social class and standing more or less important in this novel than it is in modern day England?
  7. How would you describe Snout?
  8. Why did the school not want Snout to take the Latin examinations?
  9. Why do you think the Marbely’s felt that Beatrice needed someone to overlook her finances?
  10. What was the common view of the suffragettes?
  11. How does Agatha Kent wield power in this novel?
  12. What are the accepted roles of women in this novel?
  13. Why do you suppose that Celeste’s father sacrificed her to the Germans that were burning their city?
  14. What is the real reason that the German nanny is sent to America?
  15. What is your opinion of Mr. Tillingham?

 

Helen Simonson’s website

New York Times Review

Lit Lover’s Discussion Guide

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah ~ Book Review & Discussion Guide

 

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Published:  February 3, 2015

Pages:  440

Awards:  Goodreads Choice Award for Historical Fiction (2015)

Format:  E-book

 

 

This WW2 historical fiction novel was a slow starter for me, however the character development and historical background were so beautifully and masterfully laid out that I was compulsively reading toward the end.  In fact, I was on a plane with tears streaming down my face for the last 15% of the novel.  My 5 year old son asked me what the words were in the book that were making me cry.  How could I even begin to explain!???

This is a heart-rending novel, full of love and compassion, contrasted by war.  The quote that starts the book off and is really the theme weaving itself throughout the novel within each of the characters and their relationship to each other is, “In love we find out who we want to be; in war we find out who we are.”  The main plot of this novel pivots on the relationship between two sisters and their different manners of resisting and/or complying with the German occupation of France during WW2.  Their understanding of war grows and helps them to better understand their father and his mistreatment of them when they were younger.

I have not read Kristin Hannah’s other books, but have heard that they are considered more of the “romance” and “chic-lit” genres.  I was somewhat skeptical at the outset of this novel that this might be the same as she is very descriptive in her writing, however, I grew to love and linger on her descriptions of items, people, and geography with such detail.  She describes aromas, tastes, feelings, and an array of other senses so vividly that I as the reader, felt fully transplanted while reading.  But, I also felt that there was a shift in her writing style from pre-war to wartime.  The writing was much more “flowery” in the pre-war era and during wartime things moved more quickly.

Kristin Hannah handled the relationships within the book masterfully.  I love how beautifully she describes the the bonds between sisters, between lovers, between mother and child.  The love, mistrust, abandonment, terror, and so many feelings are so vivid and intense in this book.

This novel goes in and out of present day for the narrator (1995) in America on the Oregon Coast to a third-person narrating 1939 and through WW2 in France.  It is unclear until the end of the book which sister the narrator actually is, Vianne or Isabelle.

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This map depicts the occupied and free zones which were spoke of in the book.  Both Vianne and Isabelle are in the Loire Valley during the early part of German military occupation.  Isabelle leaves Vianne to move to Paris and become part of the french resistance and ultimately “The Nightingale” helping to take downed pilots to safety across the Pyrenees, via Tours to Spain.  Vianne’s initial instinct is to protect her child and cooperate, but ultimately resists the French by helping Jewish children to safety.  The book highlights the role of women in WW2.

UnknownLoire Valley pyrennes-spain-3518988The Pyrenees

My overall rating: images  I absolutely loved it!!! Amazing!  Moving!  Deeply absorbing!  A book that stays with you long after you’ve finished it!

Discussion Questions:

  1.  Why is Isabelle’s title “The Nightingale”?  Is it because nightingales sing mostly at night?  Is there another reason?
  2. How does the book’s opening statement relate to characters in the book?   “In love we find out who we want to be; in war we find out who we are.”  How does this play out with Vianne and Isabelle’s father; Vianne; Isabelle; the German officers billeting at Vianne’s house; Antoine?
  3. How does this book compare with other WW2 historical fiction novels taking place in France?  Some examples include “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr and “Life after Life” by Kate Atkinson.  Do you have a favorite WW2 historical fiction novel?
  4. Did you find yourself identifying with one sister more than the other?  Did you find yourself admiring one sister more than the other?  Who did you expect to be the narrator at the end?
  5. If you’ve read other Kristin Hannah books, how does this book compare with her other books?
  6. Do you think France felt shame at it’s role in complying with the German occupation and enforcing internment of Jews in camps after the war?

Discussion Guide from Kristin Hannah’s website

Review by USA Today