Tag Archives: top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books on my Spring TBR List

Today’s Top Ten Tuesday will feature 10 books on my spring to be read list.   Next to each book, I will add the publication date (or expected publication date), a blurb copied from Goodreads’ description of the book and the reason why it is on my list.  This is a meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.  Have you read any of these?  What is on your spring TBR list?

 

  1.  Hillbilly Elegy:  A Memoir of a Family and a Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance – published June 28, 2016 – Part memoir, part historical and social analysis, J. D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy is a fascinating consideration of class, culture, and the American dream.

Why?  This is my book club’s pick.  So many people have asked me if I’ve read this, so I’m excited to get to this finally.

 

 

 

2.  The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti – expected publication date March 28, 2017 – Both a coming-of-age novel and a literary thriller, The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley explores what it means to be a hero, and the cost we pay to protect the people we love most.

Why?  I have never read anything by Hannah Tinti, but her books have been so well received in the past that I requested an ARC of this book from netgalley.

 

 

 

3.  We Shall Not Sleep by Estep NagyExpected publication date July 4, 2017 – Vividly capturing the rift between the cold warriors of Jim’s generation and the rebellious seekers of Catta’s, We Shall Not All Sleep is a richly told story of American class, family, and manipulation—a compelling portrait of a unique and privileged WASP stronghold on the brink of dissolution.

Why?  I read an article about what an amazing book this was, so I requested it from netgalley.

 

4.  Maybe in Another Life by Taylor Jenkins Reid – Published July 7, 2015 – From the acclaimed author of Forever, Interrupted and After I Do comes a breathtaking new novel about a young woman whose fate hinges on the choice she makes after bumping into an old flame; in alternating chapters, we see two possible scenarios unfold—with stunningly different results.

Why?  This is not my usual genre and I will probably hate it, but I’m hoping to be pleasantly surprised.  I am intrigued by the ‘Sliding Doors’ aspect to this book.  This is my other bookclub’s pick.

 

5.   Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout – Expected Publication Date April 15, 2017 – Written in tandem with My Name Is Lucy Barton and drawing on the small-town characters evoked there, these pages reverberate with the themes of love, loss, and hope that have drawn millions of readers to Strout’s work.

Why?  I love Elizabeth Strout and want to read everything she writes.  I loved ‘My Name is Lucy Barton’ and am excited to read this counterpart to it.

 

 

 

6.    Woman No 17 by Edan LepuckiExpected Publication Date May 9, 2017 – A sinister, sexy noir about art, motherhood, and the intensity of female friendships, set in the posh hills above Los Angeles, from the New York Times bestselling author of California.

Why?  I have heard exciting things about this book, so I requested it from netgalley.  It is a little outside of my usual box, but I’m super excited for it!

 

 

7.  The Gift of Failure:  How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed by Jessica Lahey – Published August 11, 2015 – Providing a path toward solutions, Lahey lays out a blueprint with targeted advice for handling homework, report cards, social dynamics, and sports. Most importantly, she sets forth a plan to help parents learn to step back and embrace their children’s failures.

Why?  One night a friend and I were discussing parenting dilemmas, strategies and favorite parenting books.  Shortly afterwards, she sent me this as a gift.

 

8.   A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway – Published 1929 – In 1918 Ernest Hemingway went to war, to the war to end all wars. He volunteered for ambulance service in Italy, was wounded, and twice decorated. Out of his experiences came A Farewell to Arms.

Why?  I chose to read this book for Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge.  It will fulfill the following requirements:  A book published between 1900 and 1950, A book about War, and a book that has been banned or frequently challenged in your country.

 

 

9.   Ill Will by Dan Chaon – Published March 7, 2017 – “We are always telling a story to ourselves, about ourselves,” Dustin Tillman likes to say. It’s one of the little mantras he shares with his patients, and it’s meant to be reassuring. But what if that story is a lie?

Why? I’d heard great things about this author, so I thought I’d give his new novel a try and requested this through netgalley.

 

 

 

10. The Legend of Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Origins by Renae De Liz, Ray Dillon (illustrator) – Published December 13, 2016 – In the beginning, there was only chaos. But Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, saw a better future–and eventually, her daughter would be destined to bring that new world to life. Before her ultimate fate unfolds, though, Diana of Themyscira must learn the important lessons of an Amazonian childhood.

Why? This will fulfill the following requirement in Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge:  Read a superhero comic with a female lead.

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Debut Novels I’ve Read in the Past 3 Years

This week’s top ten Tuesday will highlight 10 favorite debut novels (in no particular order) I’ve read in the past few years.  This meme is usually hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, however, they are taking a break.  So, this one is blogger’s choice.  I love reading debut novels!  It’s always a gamble, but it can be so satisfying to find a new author’s work to love.  Have you read any of these?  What are your recent favorite debut authors/books?

 

  1.  Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi – A family in Ghana divided by slavery, sweeping over 300 years.  (2016)

 

 

Yaa Gyasi, born in Ghana and raised in Huntsville, Alabama.  She spent 7 years writing this novel which was published when she was only 26 years old and has won numerous awards for it.

 

2. Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng– A Chinese American family searches for the reasons behind their daughter’s death. (2014)

Celeste Ng grew up Pittsburgh, PA and Shaker Heights, OH.  She graduated from Harvard and from the MFA program at the University of Michigan.

 

 

 

3. The Enchanted by Rene Denfeld– A fantastical novel exploring death row and the humanity of an inmate there. (2014)

Rene Denfeld had authored several non-fiction works prior to this first fictional novel.  She is a death penalty investigator and a mother to 3 children adopted from foster care.

 

 

 

4.  The Animators by Kayla Rae Whitaker – A novel about the power of art to heal. (2017)

Kayla Rae Whitaker has received a BA from University of Kentucky and an MFA from NYU.  After living in Brooklyn for many year, she and her husband have returned to her home state, Kentucky.

 

 

 

5. I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh – A thriller with twists, so the less said the better.  (2015)

Clare Mackintosh spent 12 years working for the police, including time on the CID.  She left in 2011, and now writes full time.

 

7.  Red Rising by Pierce Brown – A dystopian novel of epic proportions.  (2014)

Pierce Brown grew up in seven different states.  He graduated from Pepperdine University in 2010.  He wrote 6 novels and face rejection from over 120 agents prior to selling Red Rising.

 

 

7.  Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho – A magical, fantastical world set in England containing politics, romance and diversity.  (2015)

Zen Cho was born and raised in Malaysia, but currently lives in England.  She writes full time.

 

 

8.  The Most Dangerous Place on Earth by Lindsey Lee Johnson – A novel about the dangers lurking within in a wealthy Marin high school, particularly cyberbullying. (2017)

Lindsey Lee Johnson grew up in Marin County.  She currently resides in Los Angeles with her husband.  She holds a professional writing degree from the University of Southern California.

 

 

 

 

9.  Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler – A novel about the secret thrilling life of waitstaff inside one of NYC’s most famous restaurants. (2016)

Stephanie Danler waitressed in NYC after graduating from Kenyon college.  She later obtained a MFA at the New School and drew on her waiting experience in the writing of this novel.

 

 

10.  Ways to Disappear by Idra Novey  – A quirky, humorous mystery novel set in Brazil. (2016)

Idra Novey grew up in a small mining town in Pennsylvania, but has lived in Chile and Brazil.  She has translated the work of several Brazilian authors prior to publishing this book.

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Loved Less than Everyone Else

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish is about books bloggers loved more or less than everyone else.  Sorry to be so negative here, but I am going to talk about 10 books I loved less than everyone else.  How did you feel about these books?  What books would be on your list?  Feel free to argue against me!  Tell me why you loved these books or agree with me.  I welcome your thoughts and opinions!

  1.  The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein – I hated this book which is written from the perspective of a dog.  The plot is horrible!! There is a false accusation of rape and the father loses visitation rights with his daughter, blech! The dog somehow is able to tell of events occurring in courthouse and other locations he was not in.  Race car driving becomes a metaphor for life.  This was a huge bestseller, promoted by starbucks and has a goodreads average rating of 4.19.  I don’t get it!
  2. The Rent Collector by Camron Wright – This historical fiction novel takes place in the slums of Cambodia, a country which the author has never visited!!!  He was inspired to write this novel after his son traveled there and made a documentary.  The whole thing rings as false.  You must take a huge leap of faith to go along with this story.  Yet, this too, was a best-seller and has an average goodreads rating of 4.23.  My review.
  3. The Next Best Thing by Jennifer Weiner – This is the only book by Jennifer Weiner that I’ve read and I’ve heard some of her other books are better.  I thought this was pretty terrible, lacking any degree of depth whatsoever.  It’s about a young girl trying to make it in Hollywood.  It was literally painful to read and I’m pretty sure I did not make it to the end.
  4. The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty – I really disliked this book.  It is typical emotionally manipulative chick-lit.  I hated the focus on the nuclear family above all else.  I hated the spiteful relationships between the women in this novel.  Of course, we all know this was a huge best seller and very loved by many.
  5. Magic America by C.E. Medford – After listening to an interview with the author on NPR, I decided to read this book.  It involves biker angels, fairy godmothers, radioactive cats…  The problem was the story was underdeveloped and the book didn’t really take off, it just fell flat.  Not many people read this book, but you’d be surprised at all the 5 star reviews on goodreads.
  6. Bossypants by Tina Fey – I know I’m not going to be popular for putting this one on my list.  I LOVE Tina Fey, but I didn’t love this autobiography.  I love her humor and my favorite parts of this book were transcripts of some of her SNL skits.  The rest felt like scattered tidbits relating to her life.  So, I really couldn’t love this memoir.
  7. The Wednesday Sisters by Meg Waite Clayton – This is a book that got a lot of attention and was hyped as a great book club book when it came out, so my book club read it.   I found the storyline dull and the characters flat.
  8. On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan – Yes, Ian McEwan is an amazingly talented writer.  I just hated this story and am still shocked and amazed that this was a Man Booker Prize nominee.
  9. The Martian by Andy Weir – Yes, this novel is impressive on so many levels.  It is excellently written and the science element is fascinating.  However, it made me want to pluck my eyelashes out, because there was not enough human interaction.  It’s about a man alone on Mars.  I need more interpersonal interactions in my books!
  10.  Divergent by Veronica Roth – Having really enjoyed the Hunger Games series, I decided I’d give this book a try.  For me, Divergent did not live up to the hype.  It greatly paled in comparison to Hunger Games.

**  Before posting this I realized the actual meme is “Books I loved more/less than I thought I would.  I liked the way I had already created it, so kept with this slight variation.

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books I Didn’t get to in 2016 but Wish I Did

This week’s meme on The Broke and the Bookish has to do with romance.  Sorry to go against the Valentine’s theme, but, I don’t read much in the way of romance novels, so I figured I’d take the opportunity to do this top ten theme I’ve been hoping to do before too much more time elapses.  Here are the top ten books I really wanted to read in 2016 that I did not get to.   Next to each title I’ve also put in a sentence taken from the goodreads description of each.  Hopefully, by putting them all in a list here, I’ll get to most in 2017.

  1.  Portable Veblen by Elizabeth Mckenzie “Set in and around Palo Alto, amid the culture clash of new money and old (antiestablishment) values, and with the specter of our current wars looming across its pages, The Portable Veblen is an unforgettable look at the way we live now.”
  2. The Nix by Nathan Hill – “It’s 2011, and Samuel Andresen-Anderson—college professor, stalled writer—has a Nix of his own: his mother, Faye. He hasn’t seen her in decades, not since she abandoned the family when he was a boy.”
  3. All the Ugly and Wonderful Things by Bryn Greenwood – “As the daughter of a meth dealer, Wavy knows not to trust people, not even her own parents. Struggling to raise her little brother, eight-year-old Wavy is the only responsible “adult” around. “
  4. News of the World by Paulette Jiles“In the aftermath of the American Civil War, an aging itinerant news reader agrees to transport a young captive of the Kiowa back to her people in this morally complex, multi-layered novel of historical fiction..”
  5. The Vegetarian by Han Kang – “…when splintering, blood-soaked images start haunting her thoughts, Yeong-hye decides to purge her mind and renounce eating meat. In a country where societal mores are strictly obeyed, Yeong-hye’s decision to embrace a more “plant-like” existence is a shocking act of subversion.”
  6. Christodora by Tim Murphy“…Christodora is home to Milly and Jared, a privileged young couple with artistic ambitions. Their neighbor, Hector, a Puerto Rican gay man who was once a celebrated AIDS activist but is now a lonely addict, becomes connected to Milly and Jared’s lives in ways none of them can anticipate.”
  7. Dark Matter by Blake Crouch“…Dark Matter is a brilliantly plotted tale that is at once sweeping and intimate, mind-bendingly strange and profoundly human—a relentlessly surprising science-fiction thriller about choices, paths not taken, and how far we’ll go to claim the lives we dream of.”
  8. Before the Fall by Noah Hawley“With chapters weaving between the aftermath of the tragedy and the backstories of the passengers and crew members–including a Wall Street titan and his wife, a Texan-born party boy just in from London, a young woman questioning her path in life, and a career pilot–the mystery surrounding the crash heightens.”
  9. LaRose by Louise Erdrich“North Dakota, late summer, 1999. Landreaux Iron stalks a deer along the edge of the property bordering his own. He shoots with easy confidence—but when the buck springs away, Landreaux realizes he’s hit something else, a blur he saw as he squeezed the trigger. When he staggers closer, he realizes he has killed his neighbor’s five-year-old son, Dusty Ravich.”
  10. The Association of Small Bombs by Karan Mahajan “When brothers Tushar and Nakul Khurana, two Delhi schoolboys, pick up their family’s television set at a repair shop with their friend Mansoor Ahmed one day in 1996, disaster strikes without warning. A bomb…”

Have you read any of these?  Thoughts?  Any I should skip or move to the top of my list?

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I wish had more resolution to them (Books with Open Endings)

Today’s Top Ten Tuesday meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish is Books I Wish had more X in them.  I have chosen to pick 10 books that I wish had more resolution to them.  These are books that left me with a feeling that all was not resolved, that the ending was up to interpretation.  This is not necessarily a bad thing.  In many of the books I mention below, the endings are ones I love to hate, or just plain love.  I often think that leaving some loose ends allows the reader to imagine more and makes the novel stay with you to a greater extent.  @!@!@!   Major Spoiler Alert @!@!@!

  1.  Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn – This novel has perhaps one of the most controversial devisive endings of all time.  This is a thriller where you expect the bad guy to be caught it in the end.  Instead, the degree of psychopathy is unravelled until the book ends… leaving the reader wanting more.   Many have argued whether the ending was brilliant versus lazy (the author just wanted to be done with the book).  Your thoughts?
  2. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – This novel ends with the heroine getting into a black car with unknown men.  They might be helping her to escape, if we are to believe Nick.  Or they may be arresting her for treason.  What did you think?  Were you an optimist or a pessimist as this book ended?

 3.  The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt – This book is epic,  encompassing such a long time period.  The ending is strange without clear resolution for such a chaotic book.  Theo is still kind of engaged to Kitsy and trying to get the stolen works back, but there is no resolution.  Is there some symbolism of the painting to Theo’s life that it is still with him?  Was this ending satisfying or dissatisfying to you?

4.  The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman  This is a beautiful fantastical novel about a man who returns home for a funeral.  Memories of his childhood begin flooding back when he finds himself at a farm at the end of the lane where he grew up.  He and Lettie Hempstock had spent time together in their fantastical world that seems to be a beautiful highlight of his horrific, chilling childhood.  The end of the novel is vague.  He refers to this part of his childhood as “a memory forgotten.”  Did this fantastical world exist or was it his imagination.  He is seeing two moons in the rearview mirror.  Is that a hint that this other fantastical world truly exists?  

5. Atonement by Ian McEwan This is a novel that doesn’t have an open ending in the sense that the others on this list do.  It is a novel that toys with your emotions.  It tells the story of a young couple in love just before WW2.  The boy is falsely accused of rape.  However, the two reunite after he is released from prison and live happily ever after, until we later find out this is fabricated.  They both died in the war.  Briony, trying to atone for her mistake of falsely accusing him, wrote a book detailing the truths of the rape, but the book will never be published as she fears lawsuit from the couple (rapist and victim) who are now married.  When I read the book and learned that the beautiful happy ending was not true, I refused to accept it, at least for a while.  How about you?

6. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell – This book ends with Rhett leaving Scarlett and Scarlett going back to her family home.   She says “I’ll think of it tomorrow at Tara.  I can stand it then.  Tomorrow, I’ll think of some way to get him back.”  So, how are we to take this?  Will she get Rhett back?  Or is she deluding herself?  What was your take on this?  Has she gained some self understanding by this point?

7. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens – I am including this one because there are two endings to this book.  Originally, Charles Dickens wrote the book with the ending that Pip and Estella reunite years later.  Estella has been widowed by an abusive first husband and is now married to a poor doctor.  The last sentence in this version is “suffering had been stronger than Miss Havisham’s teaching and had given her a heart to understand what mine used to be.”  However, in the current version of Great Expectations read today, the ending is different, as a friend of Charles Dickens had encouraged him to change.  In this current version, Pip returns to the Satis house which has been torn down, but he sees Estella on the horizon.  We are led to believe that Pip and Estella live happily ever after.  Which ending do you prefer?  Why?

8.  Life After Life by Kate Atkinson – Is this the never ending story or the forever ending story?   I can’t decide. This book starts in 1930 where Ursula shoots Hitler in a smoky cafe after having lunch with him.  Then it goes back to 1910 where she is born and dies repeatedly, setting the book back again and again.  Her life story changing slightly each time to escape the previous death.   It is a book that never seems to really end. I loved it and felt it was brilliant, but others were thoroughly annoyed by it.  What did you think?  I thought the book might circle back to the initial scene, but it doesn’t.  Why do you think Kate Atkinson wrote it this way?

9.  The Road by Cormac McCarthy – This is a bleak dystopian world with little hope.  It is about a boy and his father who walk through this desolate lawless harsh world.  It is monotonous, joyless, brutal.  However, at the end as the father dies, the boy joins a group of kind souls who take him in.  Is this a hopeful ending for an otherwise gory bleak book?  Does it mean that society will rebuild itself?  Is this a surprising ending for Cormac McCarthy?  Why or why not?

10.  Forty Rooms by Olga Grushin – This is an amazing book that is about a life led through 40 rooms, from childhood to adulthood, from Russia to America.  It is about childhood dreams and aspirations for the future that get lost but still percolate beneath the surface.  It is about the choices women make in their lives, sacrificing some of their own dreams to be there for their families.  In this novel the fantastical blends with reality, so that there is a blur.  As the reader, and it appears even to the narrator,  the reality is unclear.  Is it a life well lived?  Was she a gifted poet?  Here is my review.

So, what other books might you include on this list?  Do you disagree with any of the books I have here?  Do you like or dislike books with open or ambiguous endings?  Please, share your thoughts!

Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Graphic Novels (An 8 year old Boy’s Perspective)

I had so much fun creating my list of top 10 favorite picture books for The Broke and the Bookish meme, that I thought I’d let my son play too.  He’s 8 years old and loves graphic novels.  He’s read tons of them and these are his favorites.  Again, these are in no particular order.  What are your favorite graphic novels for this age group?  He is always on the hunt for great books and would love your recommendations!

1.  Bone Series by Jeff Smith – a series of 10 books.  Tales of humor, mystery and adventure when 3 cousins get separated.  They attempt to find each other encountering many creatures in the process.

 

 

 

2.  Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney – My son devoured all 11 books in this series.  He was so excited to watch a movie and then so disappointed.  “Mom, this is not nearly as good as the book.”  It was a fun proud mom moment to have him make this realization.  He never asked to watch another Diary of a Wimpy Kid movie again.

 

 

  3.   Big Nate Series by Lincoln Peirce – This is an 8 book series of books that my son absolutely loved.  There are other Big Nate books out there as well, aside from the series as well as comic strip compilations.  These are books that my son goes back to and re-reads when he’s out of other reading material.  I hear him laughing out loud and he loves relaying snippets from these books to us.

 4.  The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman – Having read and loved the non-graphic version of this book, I was excited to see how my son would react to this.  At first, he was definitely taken aback by the violence with which the book starts, but he quickly got into it, and now rates it in his top ten.

 

 

 

5.  13 Story Treehouse Series by Andy Griffiths – My son has read the first 5 books in this series.  It looks like the 6th is available in text in Australia, but not yet here in the US.  My son describes this series as having both an excellent storyline and great humor.

 

 

 

6.  Meanwhile by Jason Shiga – This is a choose-your-own-adventure graphic novel, fun to read over and over with different outcomes.

 

 

 

 

7.  Star Wars Jedi Academy Series by Jeffrey Brown – This is a 3 book series that my son tore through quickly engrossing him far more than any other star wars books have.

 

 

 

8.  The Adventures of Super Diaper Baby Series by Dav Pilkey, George Beard, and Harold Hutchins – This 2 book series is for kids who love silly humor.  The thing that bothers me about this series is all the misspelled words, because it is supposed to be written by two young kids themselves.  However, this doesn’t seem to bother my son.

 

9.  Amulet (Series) by Kazu Kibuishi – A 7 book series in a terrifying world of man-eating demons, a mechanical rabbit, a giant robot and two children.

 

 

 

 

 10. Lucy and Andy Neanderthal  by Jeffrey Brown – A stand alone graphic novel by the author of the Star Wars Jedi Academy series.

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Favorite Picture Books

 

Ok, I’m finally jumping into this awesome exercise hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.  Everyone loves lists and what a great way to share some of our favorite books.  On this meme, each week there is a new topic upon which bloggers choose their own top ten and share with each other and their followers.  This week it is top ten picture books!  I love it!  Here are mine (in no particular order).  What are yours???

1.  The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires– This is a beautifully written and illustrated book empowering young girls to take risks, create, and be inventive despite setbacks.  My Review

 

 

2.  Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr and Eric Carle – This is a beautifully illustrated book that reads like a song that is easy for children to pick up.  This makes for a great book that children can “read” at a very early age.

 

3.  Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems – This book is hilarious!  It was my first exposure to Mo Willems who I believe is modern day’s Dr. Seuss.  He creates perfect books that not only thoroughly engage the reader, but are language appropriate for developing reading skills.  His books often encourage children to interact with the book, as this one surely does.

4.  I Want My Hat Back by Jon KlassenJon Klassen’s books are perfect.  The artwork has a quiet beauty and the text a subtle humor.  The stories are so perfect for kids to read again and again and love.

 

 

 

 

5.  Go, Dog. Go! by P. D. Eastman (aka Dr Seuss) – I love all of Dr Seuss’s book, the rhyming, the fluency, the fun contained within.  This one especially is loved in our family and brings out conversation about the dogs in the tree.

 

 

 

6. In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak – I love both this and Where the Wild Things Are, but decided to choose this lesser known one for my list.  I love the dreamy magical element to this book.  The illustrations are beautiful and fantastical.  A gem of a book!

 

 

7.  Library Lion by Michelle Knudsen and Kevin Hawkes – This is a wonderful story taking place within a library.  It is affectionately told and illustrated.  The moral of the story is that some rules are meant to be broken.

 

 

 

8.  Barnyard Dance by Sandra Boynton – All of Sandra Boynton’s books were favorites during the first couple years of each of my children’s lives.  Thank goodness they are sold as board book to withstand the frequent reading and often chewing on these books by my children.  The rhythm and flow of these books make them very appealing to children.  This book in particular got my children up and dancing.  It is very fun and engaging!

9.  Eloise by Kay Thompson– I just love Eloise and her antics.  She is a little girl living in the plaza with her nanny.  I love the lack of punctuation and flow of this book.  It is so fun to read!

 

 

 

10.  There is a Bird on Your Head by Mo Willems – Yes, I’m putting Mo Willems on my list twice!  I have to.  I credit the Piggie and Gerald series with teaching my boys to read.  These books were thoroughly engaging and perfect early readers for them.  I love the Piggie and Gerald personalities and their beautiful friendship.