Tag Archives: women’s literature

“Maybe in Another Life” by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Pages:  342

Published:  July 7, 2015

Format:  Audible

 

 

 

 

Light, fluffy, easy to listen to audible book.  This is a story about a young woman at a critical transition point in her life and how a small decision can lead to two different outcomes in her life.  She is in her late twenties, has just ended a relationship with a married man, is pregnant unbeknownst to her, and has just moved back to Los Angeles from the east coast.  It is the ‘Sliding Doors’ concept of following the characters past this one decision through two alternate realities.  Comparing the two realities, some things turn out differently, others the same.  In fact there are some parts that are repeated verbatim from one chapter to the next adding an element of redundancy.

There are serious life events and crises that occur within this novel, however, I did not feel like I really got to know the characters well.   Hannah, the main character, wears a high bun and loves cinnamon rolls.  These two descriptors seem to be who and what Hannah is, as they are repeated so often.  Despite the potentiality of depth given the crises that occur, it remained superficial.  The characters were G rated, lacking edginess or darkness to round them out or create intrigue for me.  Even the cheaters who hurt the main characters seem to be easily forgiven and possibly even understood by Hannah and her best friend, Gabby.

Gabby is more to Hannah than even Hannah’s family is, as Hannah’s family ran off to London while Hannah was still in high school to support Hannah’s younger sister’s dancing career.  Hannah lived with Gabby and her parents for the rest of high school.  The friendship between Gabby and Hannah is great.  It is supportive and understanding, lacking drama (in a good way).  Gabby is very concerned with wording.  She wants those around her to be politically correct and not be image conscious, to understand what really matters.   This is the part of Gabby that is especially emphasized throughout the novel.  It also contrasted sharply with Hannah repeatedly referring to herself as fat when she was pregnant.  I have to say that drove me crazy.

In all, I think the concept was wonderful, however the execution was lacking.  If you feel like a super easy, no need to think much, beach read, then maybe pick this one up.  Otherwise, I’d recommend skipping it.  

 

Discussion Questions:

  1.  Do you think that there are decisions you make that affect the rest of your life?  How often are these decisions made?  How about other people’s decisions affecting your life?
  2. Was there a life path that you preferred for Hannah?  Did one of these resonate with you more than the other?
  3. Hannah says “Believing in fate is like believing in cruise control.”  What is the message within the book of fate versus free will?
  4. Why does Gabby feel the need to be so politically correct and make sure that those around her are as well?
  5. Hannah and Gabby have a conversation about soul mates.  Do you believe that there is one person everyone is destined to be with or are there multiple someones that would be good?  What do you think the author believes?
  6. Hannah feels estranged from her parents and sister as they moved to London while she was still in high school and she stayed behind to live with Gabby’s family.  How does her relationship with her family evolve in each of the realities?
  7. Discuss the role that cinnamon rolls play in this novel.

 

Review by Aestas Book Blog

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